Women’s health expert Dr. Amy Myers is a goop-trusted authority on subjects from autoimmunity and Candida to thyroid dysfunction; and she’ll be speaking IRL at our first wellness summit on June 10. Here, Myers helps us evaluate the increasing buzz around probiotics, and outlines the ins and outs of selecting a particular supplement (whether hers or other brands). Plus, we’ve rounded up our probiotic essentials, from inner beauty powders to favorite fermentation recipes, in one guide:
The first major finding was that many people were essentially resistant to any effect from probiotics and their gut microbiome did not change after taking them.  Of 19 people in the study taking probiotics consisting of 11 of the most commonly found strains, only 8 had any notable colonization of their gut with the bacteria in the probiotics, with 3 people considered to have significant colonization and 5 people with "mild" colonization.

Since feminine health is all about balance, it only makes sense that vH’s formula would also contain a healthy dose of probiotic cultures. These live bacteria work with the prebiotic formula and pre-existing bacteria in your system to create a thriving environment for your feminine health. These probiotics are particularly helpful at promoting vaginal and urinary tract health.
Hi Joan, it’s possible, but not ideal because most pill form probiotic supplements are designed to be protected from stomach acid until the capsule reaches the intestines. It’s impossible to say how many probiotic microorganisms would survive by taking them this way, but certainly less than if you swallow the pills. I would recommend trying a probiotic gummy product or some other probiotic that comes in something other than pill form rather than opening up the capsules.
Some foods are made by adding bacteria — yogurt, pickles, cottage cheese, kombucha, and sauerkraut are good examples. Those foods work to provide the same probiotic benefits as supplements. However, most foods are so processed and pasteurized that it’s unlikely you’ll see the same benefits, let alone the right strains, as you would with a supplement. Regardless, it can’t hurt to get extra probiotics through your diet.
Billed as the most effective probiotic currently available on the market, Pro-25 combines 13 of the most powerful probiotic strains to deliver the most robust and well-rounded overall digestive health. Delayed-release capsules also protect live organisms from your stomach acid, delivering the right strains to the right location in your digestive system, ensuring maximum efficacy and benefits.

What about prebiotics vs probiotics? Prebiotics are the food fibers that go through the gut unchanged and are then used by good colon bacteria as a food source for their own growth. Everyone already has most of these good bacteria present, but often in small quantities. Prebiotics are used to stimulate their growth. Simply stated, you already grow your own probiotics within your colon. You do not rely on them to make the passage through the stomach acid — acid that can destroy many probiotic bacteria. That’s why taking a probiotic supplement or adding probiotic foods to your diet does not always help your digestive system. You can eat as many probiotic bacteria as you want, but if they don’t survive the trip to the colon, your effort will be fruitless.
Back to the question of what are probiotics: There are five main types, each in its own classification called a genus. Within each genus there are multiple species, and within those species there are multiple strains. For example, Lactobacillus is a very common genus of probiotics. Within that genus are numerous species, such as rhamnosus. The genus and species of a microbe are always italicized, making it easy to know that a microbe is involved. In a species such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus (often abbreviated L. rhamnosus), there are many strains. An example of the name of a strain is L. rhamnosus GR-1.

In these cases, IBS is essentially just TMI. “For the colon to be functioning properly, it needs to be contracting and relaxing in a way that is conducive to regular bowel movements that occur at predictable times and don’t occur too frequently or too rarely," Lebwohl says. "And the bowel needs to be giving infrequent feedback to the brain. People should not be getting updates from their bowel in terms of cramps or the feeling of having to have a bowel movement too often. Yet, people with IBS get very frequent unsolicited ‘progress reports’ from the bowel.”


The popular frenzy surrounding probiotics is fueled in large part by surging scientific and public interest in the human microbiome: the overlapping ecosystems of bacteria and other microorganisms found throughout the body. The human gastrointestinal system contains about 39 trillion bacteria, according to the latest estimate, most of which reside in the large intestine. In the past 15 years researchers have established that many of these commensal microbes are essential for health. Collectively, they crowd out harmful microbial invaders, break down fibrous foods into more digestible components and produce vitamins such as K and B12.

What’s more, RAW Probiotics are exactly what they purport to be – raw! They’re uncooked, untreated and unadulterated, and have no fillers or binders. You also won’t find any displeasing carriers, such as maltodextrin or dextrose. And since RAW Probiotics are kept in temperature-controlled cold storage through delivery and until they make it into your fridge, you can be sure your probiotics “arrive alive.”
"Although all of our probiotic-consuming volunteers showed probiotics in their stool, only some of them showed them in their gut, which is where they need to be," co-senior author Eran Segal, a computational biologist at the Weizmann Institute, said in the statement. "If some people resist and only some people permit them, the benefits of the standard probiotics we all take can't be as universal as we once thought."
There are a lot of factors that play a role in how well probiotics survive before it actually hits your system. How long a store keeps the product in storage before selling it, the temperature at which you store the probiotic, the foods you eat the probiotic with, or the medications you take can affect the effectiveness of the probiotic. If you’re buying a product closer to its “Sell By” date, you might not reap the full benefits because that probiotic may not be as strong.
You dread stepping on the scale and avoid looking at your profile in the mirror because you know you gained weight and need to lose some. You tried every diet on the market to no avail. Your frustration level is high, but you do not need to give up hope. The first thing to do is to love yourself regardless of your weight so that your emotions and stress levels do not sabotage your efforts. You can love yourself while working toward self-improvement.
Safety Warning In rare cases, some people may experience stomach upset due to Probiotics Cleansing Effect. This is positive sign as high potency probiotics removing waste or toxic substances from body. To avoid reaction, it's recommended to start with less dosage and slowly increase. Do not exceed recommended dose. Pregnant or nursing mothers, children under the age of 18, and individuals with a known medical condition should consult a physician before using this or any dietary supplement. May adversely affect existing medical conditions, including but not limited to: IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome), Gastritis, G.E.R.D. Please note: Probiotics may temporarily cause bloating, gas or gassy, stomach pain, hurt stomach or cramps (cramped, cramping), vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, changes in digestion, allergic reactions, heartburn, jitters, rashes, skin irritation, breakouts, headache, fatigue, changes in appetite, joints hurt, spike blood glucose, bad pains, terrible symptoms, tiredness, passed out or sick feeling or sickness. These possible side effects are rare and will vary from one person to another in occurrence and severity. This product does not contain Milk, Eggs, Soy, Wheat, Peanuts, Tree Nuts, Seafood, Fish. The Lactobacillus strain contained is grown on a dairy medium, but the dairy is removed in processing. People with severe allergies to dairy and those that are lactose intolerant should consult a medical professional before taking this product, as adverse reactions can occur. If for any reason you experience any adverse effects, immediately discontinue use of the product and consult with your doctor. Do not use if seal is missing or broken. Keep Out Of Reach of Children and Pets. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. DO NOT USE IF SAFETY SEAL IS DAMAGED OR MISSING. STORE IN A COOL, DRY PLACE. Do not exceed recommended dose. Pregnant or nursing mothers, children under the age of 18 and individual with a known medical condition should consult a physician before using this or any other dietary supplement. Do not take this supplement if you are allergic to any of the listed ingredients. May adversely affect existing medical conditions, including but not limited to: G.E.R.D., IBS, Stomach Ulcer(s), asthma. Please note: Probiotics 60 Billion CFU may temporarily cause heartburn, gas, upset stomach, stomach cramps, stomach pain (hurt stomach), irritated stomach, burning stomach, acid reflux, bloating, constipation, increased chest congestion/mucus, insomnia, inflammation, fatigue, make your brain not feel right, nose bleeds, agitation, headaches, nausea, diarrhea (liquid stools, burning bowel movements, runs), intestinal issues, dry mouth, rash, itching, hives, dizziness, swollen tongue, vomiting, heart palpitations, fast heartbeat, unexpected issues or sickness. These possible side effects are rare and will vary from one person to another in occurrence and severity. If for any reason you experience any adverse effects, immediately discontinue use of the product and consult with your doctor. Do not use if seal is missing or broken. Keep Out Of Reach of Children and Pets. Caution: As with any dietary supplement, consult your healthcare practicioner before using this product, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, anticipate surgery, take medication on a regular basis or are otherwise under medical supervision. Keep out of reach of children. Do not use if safety seal is broken or missing. Contains no carriers, fillers, artificial colors . This product is labelled to United States standards and may differ from similar products sold elsewhere in its ingredients, labeling and allergen warnings

Before buying this, I didn't realize that some strains of bacteria used in probiotics produce histamines. When I discovered this, I looked up which ones do, and all three I discovered are used in this one. If you're sensitive to histamines or have leaky gut (which makes you sensitive to histamines), then this is not for you. According to an article on bullet proof, an overload of histamines "leads to increased inflammation and many other symptoms including: skin irritation, hives, throat tightening, increased heart rate, nasal congestion, migraines, fatigue, heartburn, reflux, and weight gain." I'm sure this can work for some people, but probably only despite the histamine-producing bacteria.
What about prebiotics vs probiotics? Prebiotics are the food fibers that go through the gut unchanged and are then used by good colon bacteria as a food source for their own growth. Everyone already has most of these good bacteria present, but often in small quantities. Prebiotics are used to stimulate their growth. Simply stated, you already grow your own probiotics within your colon. You do not rely on them to make the passage through the stomach acid — acid that can destroy many probiotic bacteria. That’s why taking a probiotic supplement or adding probiotic foods to your diet does not always help your digestive system. You can eat as many probiotic bacteria as you want, but if they don’t survive the trip to the colon, your effort will be fruitless.
We have to give a nod to the most famous probiotic food: yogurt. Whether you love Greek or regular, low-fat or full-fat, look for the phrase "live active cultures" on the label. And although choosing a plain yogurt has less added sugar than the flavored kinds, Tallmadge gives you the okay to choose a fruit-infused flavor if that's the only way you'll eat it. Just be sure to aim for fewer than 15 grams of the sweet stuff per serving; sugar can feed the bad bugs in your gut.

The research also showed that while probiotics colonised the gastrointestinal tract of some people, the gut microbiome of others just expelled them. There was no way of telling from their stool sample which category people fell into. “Some people accept probiotics in their gut, while others just pass them from one end to the other,” says Elinav. They found that the probiotic colonisation patterns were highly dependent on the individual. That tells us that the concept that everyone can benefit from a universal probiotic bought from the supermarket is empirically wrong, he says.


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CFU: This is the number of "colony forming units" present in each dose, which are measured in the billions. And while more isn't always better, "you want at least 20 to 50 billion CFU," says Dr. Nazareth. Just for reference, a very high dose is 400 CFU, which most experts agree is not necessary unless your health care practitioner specifically recommends this for you. It's also important to check for the guaranteed CFU upon expiration, which should be listed clearly. "Some products only guarantee the CFU number at the time of manufacturing, therefore will be less potent by the time the product reaches your home," she says.

While past studies have investigated similar questions, they have all used patients' excrement as a proxy for microbe activity in the GI tract. Instead, Elinav, his colleague Eran Segal, (a computational biologist at the Weizmann Institute), and their teams spearheaded by Niv Zmora, Jotham Suez, Gili Zilberman Schapira, and Uria Mor of the Elinav lab collaborated with Zamir Halpern, Chief of Gastroenterology at the Tel Aviv Medical Center to measure gut colonization directly.
Yogurt: It can contain Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Bifidobacterium bifidum. Research has shown links with yogurt to have positive effects on the gut microbiota and is associated with a reduced risk for gastrointestinal disease and improvement of lactose intolerance (especially among children), type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, allergies and respiratory diseases, as well as improved dental and bone health.
What exactly do probiotics do? They are believed to protect us in two ways. The first is the role that they play in our digestive tract. We know that our digestive tract needs a healthy balance between the good and bad bacteria, so what gets in the way of this? It looks like our lifestyle is both the problem and the solution. Poor food choices, emotional stress, lack of sleep, antibiotic overuse, other drugs, and environmental influences can all shift the balance in favor of the bad bacteria.
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